Power

Brazil’s campaign funding continues to favor the election of white men

Despite quotas to increase funding — and thus the election chances — of female and non-white candidates, white male candidates continue to receive the lion’s share of campaign funds and dominate political power centers

campaign Black and indigenous candidates are less represented on the ballot — and therefore in public office. Photo: Fernando Frazão/ABr
Black and indigenous candidates are less represented on the ballot — and therefore in public office. Photo: Fernando Frazão/ABr

Sanny Figueiredo, the first black woman to ever run for the Senate representing the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul, campaigned on a platform that defended public policies aimed at women and reducing social inequalities. But she never polled at more than 1 percent, and on Election Day received a mere 0.54 percent of the vote. After a quick glance at the details of her campaign, it’s no surprise why.

Ms. Figueiredo received just BRL 100,000 (USD 18,547) from her party, the Brazilian Socialist Party, to run her campaign. In contrast, the winning candidate, current Vice-President Hamilton Mourão, had...

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