Numbers of the week: Feb. 29, 2020

. Feb 29, 2020
covid-19 Brazil by the Numbers oil bolsonaro energy bhp country risk marielle poverty rio currency amazon paraisópolis xp 2019 inflation nazi imf coronavirus carnival Iron ore femicides coronavirus deaths

This is Brazil by the Numbers, a weekly digest of the most interesting figures tucked inside the latest news about Brazil. A selection of numbers that help explain what is going on in Brazil. On this Leap Day: Coronavirus reaches Brazil and sends havoc through financial markets. Deaths in car accidents decrease during Carnival. A vessel loaded with iron ore sinking along the Brazilian coast. Bolsonaro’s social media success. And more.

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1 confirmed coronavirus infection

A

61-year-old man tested <a href="https://brazilian.report/newsletters/brazil-weekly/2020/02/26/brazil-first-coronavirus-infection-confirmed-sao-paulo-petrobras-2020-markets/">positive for Covid-19 in São Paulo</a>, making Brazil the only Latin American country with a confirmed coronavirus case, until Mexico confirmed their own cases on Friday. The patient has reportedly shown mild symptoms and according to Albert Einstein Hospital he “is in a good clinical state and has no need to be hospitalized.” The man had been in Italy on a business trip between February 9 and 21—a period that coincides with the coronavirus boom in the southern European country, where 889 cases have been confirmed. </p> <p>In Argentina, a patient in the tourist region of El Calafate is being tested.</p> <hr class="wp-block-separator"/> <h2>300,000 tons of oil and iron ore</h2> <p>The MV Stellar Banner ship—chartered by Brazil&#8217;s mining giant Vale—was loaded with iron ore when it left a port in the Maranhão state on February 24 heading to China. Soon after, however, the crew identified two leaks in its hull and the captain <a href="https://brazilian.report/newsletters/brazil-daily/2020/02/27/bolsonaro-impeachment-offense-markets-coronavirus-vale/">grounded the vessel on a sandbank to prevent it from sinking</a>. The ship is loaded with 294,800 tons of iron ore—plus 3,500 tons of residual oil and 140 tons of distilled oil (used as fuel). The Navy is monitoring the situation and investigating the cause of the incident. Aerial images show oil stains in a radius of 1 kilometer from the ship.</p> <p>This could become Vale&#8217;s third massive environmental disaster since 2015—after the tailings dam collapses in <a href="https://brazilian.report/society/2018/11/05/mariana-disaster-2015-tragedy/">Mariana</a> and <a href="https://brazilian.report/society/2019/01/27/brumadinho-dam-collapse-mariana/">Brumadinho</a>.</p> <hr class="wp-block-separator"/> <h2>490 facial surgeries </h2> <p>At least 490 people underwent facial surgery related to incidents that happened during Carnival celebrations in Salvador, the state capital of Bahia. In most cases, surgery was required following brawls and physical assaults.&nbsp;</p> <p>Municipal health services made five surgical teams available at celebration locations. Quick treatment in such cases reduces risks of permanent facial deformations by 90 percent, according to authorities. Another upside is in reducing the burden on the public healthcare system—as most cases don&#8217;t require hospitalization.</p> <hr class="wp-block-separator"/> <h2>6.4 million revelers</h2> <p>According to Riotur, the <a href="https://brazilian.report/opinion/2020/02/19/downside-brazil-being-country-of-carnival/">Rio de Janeiro street carnival</a> gathered 6.4 million people from its official opening on February 21 until Tuesday. In the four days of Carnival, municipal authorities detected clandestine 162 street parades across the city.&nbsp;</p> <p>Rio&#8217;s public cleaning services informed that 554 tons of trash were collected—186 of these tons came in the area of the Sambadrome alone, where the famous samba school parades take place. And 886 people were fined for public urination throughout the holiday.</p> <hr class="wp-block-separator"/> <h2>3.20 percent</h2> <p>Financial institutions surveyed by the Brazilian Central Bank reduced their projections for inflation in 2020 for the eighth straight time. The forecast fell from 3.22 to 3.20 percent. For 2021, the inflation estimates remain at 3.75 percent.</p> <p>Meanwhile, <a href="https://brazilian.report/newsletters/brazil-daily/2020/02/05/industry-numbers-spark-early-2020-pessimism-brazil-orban-5g/">GDP growth projections continue to be cut down</a>, from 2.3 percent on February 3 to 2.2 percent this week.</p> <hr class="wp-block-separator"/> <h2>10 million</h2> <p>Using his Twitter account, President Jair Bolsonaro <a href="https://twitter.com/jairbolsonaro/status/1233063675197566978">celebrated</a> a milestone for his social media-driven time in office: he reached 10 million likes on Facebook and over 6 million followers on Twitter. Over the past few weeks, users—especially journalists—have complained about the intensification of hate speech coming from bot-like accounts. Journalist Patrícia Campos Mello, who investigated the use of social media bots to help Mr. Bolsonaro’s 2018 presidential bid, was the principal target of recent attacks.</p> <hr class="wp-block-separator"/> <h2>33 percent fewer deaths</h2> <p>According to the São Paulo Military Police, 14 people died in accidents across the state during Carnival (which went from February 21 to 25). That was the lowest amount for the past 20 years and a 33-percent decrease from last year. Another 84 people were seriously injured in the 815 accidents registered during the holiday.

 
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