Brazil’s unemployment rate is falling at a very slow pace, according to data published by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. The stats, with the mobile average of the last three months, show that since 2016, overall unemployment in the country hasn’t dropped below 12 percent of the workforce, or about one in eight.


brazil unemployment


Of course, the numbers vary a lot according to the characteristics of the population. Every quarter, the official statistics agency publishes more granular data which allows us to see that.

</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although most unemployed people have at most completed high school, having more years of study does not translate as much into better job prospects. The share of all unemployed people with higher educations rose from 12.7 percent in 2012 to 17.4 percent in the most recent quarterly numbers.</span></p> <hr /> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-18394" src="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-XBzCE.png" alt="college educated unemployed workers" width="1200" height="800" srcset="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-XBzCE.png 1200w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-XBzCE-300x200.png 300w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-XBzCE-768x512.png 768w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-XBzCE-1024x683.png 1024w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-XBzCE-610x407.png 610w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a raw headcount, the total amount of unemployed people with some form of higher education has more than doubled in the last seven years, from less than one million in 2012 to more than 2.3 million in 2019. (For high school dropouts and graduates, the biggest share of unemployed it only doubled.)</span></p> <hr /> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-18399" src="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-IKvub-1.png" alt="unemployment education" width="1200" height="800" srcset="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-IKvub-1.png 1200w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-IKvub-1-300x200.png 300w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-IKvub-1-768x512.png 768w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-IKvub-1-1024x683.png 1024w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-IKvub-1-610x407.png 610w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /></p> <hr /> <h2>A bigger fall</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since 2012, when the institute adopted its current methodology, the best-educated people—those who have a college education (finished or not)—lost the most purchasing power. Although mean nominal wages for workers (adjusted for inflation) have risen nearly 5 percent in seven years, the increases happened only among those with up to one year of study and those who went to high school. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Workers who have some form of higher education are worth 14 percent less than they used to be in 2012, when adjusted for inflation. College graduates lost about 10 percent of their purchasing power.</span></p> <hr /> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-18396" src="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-01DkP.png" alt="purchasing power education" width="1200" height="800" srcset="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-01DkP.png 1200w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-01DkP-300x200.png 300w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-01DkP-768x512.png 768w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-01DkP-1024x683.png 1024w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-01DkP-610x407.png 610w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you break it down by region, the biggest losses for those who attended higher education happened in the North. There, their real losses in purchasing power are 26 percent in comparison to what they made in 2012.</span></p> <hr /> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-18398" src="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-Gjsly.png" alt="college brazil unemployment" width="1200" height="800" srcset="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-Gjsly.png 1200w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-Gjsly-300x200.png 300w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-Gjsly-768x512.png 768w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-Gjsly-1024x683.png 1024w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-Gjsly-610x407.png 610w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For workers who graduated from college, the worst region is the largely agriculture-based Center-West. These workers lost 21 percent of their purchasing power. However, in the previous chart, you can see that workers in the Center-West who attended college, but did not graduate, nearly gained purchasing power.</span></p> <hr /> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-18397" src="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-xQtsv.png" alt="college brazil unemployment" width="1200" height="800" srcset="https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-xQtsv.png 1200w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-xQtsv-300x200.png 300w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-xQtsv-768x512.png 768w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-xQtsv-1024x683.png 1024w, https://brazilian.report/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/export-xQtsv-610x407.png 610w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /></p> <p>

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MoneyJun 02, 2019

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BY Marcelo Soares

Marcelo Soares is a Brazilian journalist specializing in data journalism and reader engagement.