Latin America

Banks weigh in on the economic impact of Chile’s constitutional reform proposal

With the final draft almost ready, financial analysts see the glass as half-empty with regards to property rights, public spending, and debt sustainability

constitutional reform La Moneda Palace, the seat of the government of Chile. Photo: Louie Lea/Shutterstock
La Moneda Palace, the seat of the government of Chile. Photo: Louie Lea/Shutterstock

The draft of Chile’s new constitution is almost ready.

After months of debates and votes across various committees and the Constituent Assembly floor, a total of 499 articles were approved for inclusion.

Now, the draft is in the hands of the recently created Harmonization Committee, an ad-hoc body designed to weed out inconsistencies and redundancies in the text and deliver a final, polished proposal.

At the same time, another two groups will take care of supplementary aspects of the new Constitution: the Preamble Committee will write introductory texts before articles, while the Transitory Regulations Committee takes charge of...

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