Latin America

Peronism is in crisis. But what exactly is it?

Peronism has long troubled foreign commentators looking for an easy way to describe it. Ideologically amorphous, it has been home equally to left nationalists and right-wing neoliberals

A man sells T-shirts with the faces of former Argentine presidents Nestor and Cristina Kirchner in a demonstration. The Kirchners have been the modern face of Peronism. Photo: Matias Lynch/Shutterstock
A man sells T-shirts with the faces of former Argentine presidents Nestor and Cristina Kirchner in a demonstration. The Kirchners have been the modern face of Peronism. Photo: Matias Lynch/Shutterstock

Peronism in the news again in Argentina. Its electoral collapse has been followed by some very public infighting as the country struggles to find answers to its continued economic crises.

But much international reporting on Peronism tends to lead to confusion among readers, as the party does not occupy a discreet place on the left-right political spectrum, confounding easy description.

The Kirchner family, which has dominated the Peronist movement over the last two decades, originates from the party’s left faction. But how can we make sense of the fact that Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, after forcing cabinet changes...

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